Top 4 Reasons You Should Eat a Small Amount of Peanuts or Peanut Butter Everyday

Aug 25, 2017 | Disease Prevention, Heart Health, Long Life, News, Weight Maintenance

Eat Peanuts Daily!

Live a longer life.

  • Eating peanuts has been shown to increase the lifespan.
  • Recent research from Harvard showed that people who eat peanuts everyday decrease their risk of death from all causes by 20%.1

2. Shrink your waistline.

  • Peanuts and peanut butter are beneficial for weight maintenance.
  • Research from Purdue University showed that peanuts increase the hormone peptide YY, which promotes satiety and fullness.2
  • Frequent peanut and peanut butter eaters have lower BMIs and body weight even if they consume more calories.3

3. Follow your heart.

  • Peanuts carry the American Heart Association Heart-Check logo.
  • Research from Harvard showed that eating peanuts daily reduces risk of death from heart disease by 29%.1
  • Replacing red meat in the diet with a plant-protein like peanuts can decrease the risk of heart disease by 19%.4

4. Prevent disease with plant protein

  • A one-ounce serving of peanuts contains about 8 grams of cholesterol-free plant protein.5
  • Peanuts contain more protein than any other nut.5
  • Research from Harvard shows that a diet high in red meat is associated with unfavorable biomarkers of inflammation and glucose metabolism. Substituting red meat with another protein food, such as peanuts, is associated with a healthier biomarker profile.6
  • Another study from Harvard found that swapping one serving of processed or unprocessed red meat for an alternative protein such as nuts can decrease risk of stroke by 17%.7

1. Bao Y, Han J, Hu FB. Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med. 2013;369:2001-11.

2. Reis CEG, Ribiero DN, Costa NMB, Bressan J, Mattes RD. Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycaemic response and appetite in obese women with high type 2 diabetes risk: a randomised crossover clinical trial. British Journal of Nutrition, Available on CJO 2012 doi:10.1017/S0007114512004217.

3. Kirkmeyer S., Mattes R., Effects of food attributes on hunger and food intake. Int J Obesity. 2000;24:1167-75.

4. Pan A, et al. Red Meat Consumption and mortality, Arch Int Med. 2012;172(7): 555-63.

5. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2013, USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 26. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page, http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/ ndl.

6. Ley SH, Sun Q, Willett WC, et al. Associations between red meat intake and biomarkers of inflammation and glucose metabolism in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;99(2):352-360. doi:10.3945/ ajcn.113.075663.

7. Bernstein AM, Pan A, Rexrode KM, et al. Dietary protein sources and the risk of stroke in men and women. Stroke J Cereb Circ. 2012;43(3):637-644. doi:10.1161/ STROKEAHA.111.633404.