Peanut Nutrition Facts

While there are many snack and ingredient choices out there, the nutritional value of peanut butter and peanuts are relatively high compared to other options. For example, in the legume or dried bean family, peanuts are pretty low in calories. Plus, they are a terrific source of protein!

But the story gets better and better. In fact, you might be surprised with just how great the nutritional value of peanut butter, roasted peanuts and other peanut products areonce you see the peanut nutrition data below—especially when you consider the significant amounts of the following nutrients found in a single ounce. Check out these peanut nutrition labels to find out more!

Raw Peanuts Nutrition Facts

1 oz of raw peanuts contain the following:
Peanuts Calories: 161
Protein: 7.3 g
Total Carbohydrate: 4.6 g
Dietary Fiber: 2.4 g
Total Fat: 14 g
Sodium: 5 mg

This is only a snapshot of the nutritional value of peanuts. For more information on specific vitamins and minerals and other peanut products, like the nutritional content of peanut butter, check out the nutritional information chart below.

 

Nutrition Breakdown

Protein

A one-ounce serving of peanuts—about a handful—is considered a good source of protein based on the United States Department of Agriculture Nutrient Database. Peanuts and peanut butter alike provide 7 grams of high quality, plant-based protein to your diet. Since the protein in peanuts is plant-based, it carries with it additional components promoting positive health benefits like fiber and unique bioactives, unlike animal protein.

Fat

The 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest cooking and purchasing products made with oils higher in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat rather than butter, shortening, or coconut or palm oils. Luckily, more than 80% of the good fats in peanuts are from heart-healthy unsaturated fats. Scientific studies show that when healthy fats replace bad fats in our diets, the risk of cardiovascular disease as well as lower inflammation.

Fiber

Peanuts are a good source of fiber according to the United States Department of Agriculture’s Nutrient Database. Over a third of the carbohydrates in peanuts is fiber and according to the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines, more than 90 percent of women and 97 percent of men do not meet recommended intakes for dietary fiber.

Vitamins and Minerals

Peanuts and peanut butter are full of vitamins and minerals that are integral to growth, development, metabolic function, and immunity. There are a variety of micronutrients and bioactives that contribute to the nutritional content of peanuts.

 

Health Benefits of Peanuts

 

Peanuts Can Help You Live Longer

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that you can lower your risk of dying prematurely from multiple causes, including cardiovascular disease (one of the leading causes of death worldwide, according to the World Health Organization). All it takes is eating a healthy plant-based diet with plenty of nuts, legumes, fruits and vegetables.1

Peanuts Promote Weight Loss Including Belly Fat

Consuming a small serving of peanuts or peanut butter daily for weight management and weight loss has been proven to positively impact the success of diets. One of the reasons for these exciting results may be because of the energy absorption benefits that peanuts provide. Although you may be satisfied after eating peanuts, you may not absorb all the calories consumed from peanuts and peanut products.

Can Help Relieve Inflammation

Foods with low glycemic loads have been shown to decrease inflammation as well. Fortunately, peanuts are a low-glycemic index food that’s full of anti-inflammatory ingredients, including certain fats, antioxidants, dietary fiber, arginine, and magnesium.

Promotes Heart Health

Other studies have found evidence pointing to additional components playing a part in peanuts’ heart-protective powers. Arginine, like that found in peanuts, may improve circulation and reduce heart disease risk. Peanuts are also a good source of vitamin E, which, when consumed in low quantities, can lead to benefits against coronary heart disease. But this is just the beginning. Make sure to check out the 6 ways peanuts help your heart.

 

Early Introduction of Peanuts

 

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) estimates that only 0.6 – 1.0% of Americans have peanut allergy, and studies show that up to 20% of peanut allergies can be outgrown. A peanut allergy occurs when a person’s immune system does not recognize peanut protein and mistakenly overreacts to it. Both genetic and environmental factors appear to be involved.

Some studies estimate that as many as 2% of children may have a peanut allergy. However, the true prevalence of food allergies is unknown. Those with a family history of allergy, asthma, or eczema, may be at increased risk.

But there is hope. Research shows that early peanut introduction in a child’s life (between 4-6 months) can reduce peanut allergy risk by 86%. For those who have already been diagnosed with a peanut allergy, various interventions are available that show promise. Ask your primary care doctor about the options you may have.

 

Sources

  1. Kim H, Caulfield LE, Garcia-Larsen V, Steffen LM, Coresh J, Rebholz CM. Plant-Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All-Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle-Aged Adults. J Am Heart Assoc. 2019 Aug 20;8(16):e012865. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.119.012865. Epub 2019 Aug 7. PubMed PMID: 31387433.
Raw Peanuts (1 oz.)
Nutrients
Amount
Calories
161
Protein
7.3 g
Total Carbohydrate
4.6 g
Dietary Fiber
2.4 g
Total Fat
14 g
Saturated Fat
1.8 g
Monounsaturated Fat
6.9 g
Polyunsaturated Fat
4.4 g
Vitamin E
2.4 mg AT
Folate
68 mcg
Niacin
3.4 mg
Thiamin
0.18 mg
Riboflavin
0.04 mg
Pantothenic acid
0.5 mg
Vitamin B6
0.10 mg
Zinc
0.93 mg
Copper
0.32 mg
Selenium
2.0 mcg
Magnesium
48 mg
Phosphorus
107 mg
Potassium
200 mg
Calcium
26 mg
Sodium
5 mg
Iron
1.3 mg
Cholesterol
0.0 mg
Resveratrol
present
Arginine
0.88 g

If you like sticking to the basics, then check out the nutritional breakdown of peanuts calories, protein, fats, vitamins and more.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018.
Nutrient Data Laboratory

Dry Roasted, Salted Peanuts (1 oz.)
% Daily Value
Nutrients
Amount
n/a
Calories
166.0
14%
Protein
6.9 g
2%
Total Carbohydrate
6.0 g
9%
Dietary Fiber
2.4 g
18%
Total Fat
14.1 g
11%
Saturated Fat
2.2 g
n/a
Monounsaturated Fat
7.4 g
n/a
Polyunsaturated Fat
2.8 g
n/a
Omega 6 fatty acid
2.7 g
n/a
Omega 3 fatty acid
trace
9%
Vitamin E
1.4 mg AT
7%
Folate
27 mcg
25%
Niacin
4.07 mg
3%
Thiamin
0.04 mg
5%
Riboflavin
0.06 mg
n/a
Pantothenic acid
0.29 mg
8%
Vitamin B6
0.13 mg
7%
Zinc
0.79 mg
13%
Copper
0.12 mg
5%
Selenium
2.6 mcg
12%
Magnesium
50 mg
8%
Phosphorus
103 mg
4%
Potassium
180 mg
1%
Calcium
16 mg
5%
Sodium
116 mg
3%
Iron
0.45 mg
Cholesterol
0.0 mg
Resveratrol
present
Arginine
0.8g

Dry roasted peanut benefits don’t stop at taste. Their nutritional value makes them a snack or recipe ingredient that you don’t have to feel guilty about.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018.
Nutrient Data Laboratory.

Oil-Roasted, Salted Peanuts (1 oz.)

Nutrients

Amount

Calories
170
Protein
8.0 g
Total Carbohydrate
4.3 g
Dietary Fiber
2.7 g
Total Fat
14.9 g
Saturated Fat
2.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat
7.4 g
Polyunsaturated Fat
4.3 g
Omega 6 fatty acid
4.3 g
Omega 3 fatty acid
trace
Vitamin E
2.0 mg AT
Folate
34.0 mcg
Niacin
3.9 mg
Thiamin
0.02 mg
Riboflavin
0.03 mg
Pantothenic acid
0.34 mg
Vitamin B6
0.13 mg
Zinc
0.93 mg
Copper
0.15 mg
Magnesium
50 mg
Phosphorus
113 mg
Potassium
206 mg
Calcium
17 mg
Sodium
91 mg
Iron
0.43 mg
Cholesterol
0 mg
Resveratrol
present
Arginine
0.92 g
Total phytosterols
62.4 mg

Oil-roasted peanuts are a great way to benefit from the nutritional benefits of peanuts while not skipping out on taste.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018.
Nutrient Data Labratory

Peanut Butter, smooth style, with salt (2tbsp.)
Nutrients
Amount
Calories
191
Protein
7.1 g
Total Carbohydrate
7.1 g
Dietary Fiber
1.6 g
Total Fat
16.4 g
 Saturated Fat
3.3 g
 Monounsaturated Fat
7.6 g
 Polyunsaturated Fat
4.0 g
  Omega 6 fatty acid
4.0 g
  Omega 3 fatty acid
trace
Vitamin E
2.9 mg AT
Folate
28 mcg
Niacin
4.2 mg
Thiamin
0.05 mg
Riboflavin
0.06 mg
Pantothenic acid
0.36 mg
Vitamin B6
0.14 mg
Zinc
0.8 mg
Copper
0.14 mg
Selenium
1.3 mcg
Magnesium
54 mg
Phosphorus
107 mg
Potassium
179 mg
Calcium
16 mg
Sodium
136 mg
Iron
0.60 mg
Cholesterol
0 mg
Resveratrol
present
Arginine
0.88 g

The nutritional value of peanut butter remains even in the creamiest of peanut butter. It’s so good it’s hard to believe it’s good for you!

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018. Nutrient Data Laboratory.

Peanut Butter, chunky style, with salt (2 tbsp.)
Nutrients
Amount
Calories
188
Protein
7.7 g
Total Carbohydrate
6.9 g
Dietary Fiber
2.6 g
Total Fat
16 g
Saturated Fat
2.4 g
Monounsaturated Fat
7.4 g
Polyunsaturated Fat
4.5 g
Vitamin E
2.02 mg AT
Folate
29 mcg
Niacin
4.4 mg
Thiamin
0.03 mg
Riboflavin
0.04 mg
Pantothenic acid
0.36 mg
Vitamin B6
0.13 mg
Zinc
0.89 mg
Copper
0.19 mg
Selenium
2.6 mcg
Magnesium
51 mg
Phosphorus
102 mg
Potassium
238 mg
Calcium
14 mg
Sodium
156 mg
Iron
0.61 mg
Cholesterol
0 mg
Resveratrol
present
Arginine
0.87 g

Chunky peanut butter nutritional information doesn’t look much different than smooth, but this peanut butter can add a little extra to an afternoon snack or lunch recipe.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018.
Nutrient Data Laboratory.

Peanut Oil (1 tbsp.)
Nutrients
Amount
Calories
119
Protein
0 g
Total Carbohydrate
0 g
Dietary Fiber
0 g
Total Fat
13.5 g
Saturated Fat
2.3 g
Monounsaturated Fat
6.2 g
Polyunsaturated Fat
4.3 g
Omega 6 fatty acid
4.3 g
Omega 3 fatty acid
0
Vitamin E
2.1 mg AT
Folate
0 mcg
Niacin
0 mg
Thiamin
0 mg
Riboflavin
0 mg
Pantothenic acid
0 mg
Vitamin B6
0 mg
Zinc
0 mg
Copper
0 mg
Magnesium
0 mg
Phosphorus
0 mg
Potassium
0 mg
Calcium
0 mg
Sodium
0 mg
Iron
0 mg
Cholesterol
0 mg
Resveratrol
n/a
Arginine
0 mg

Peanut oil is a great cooking alternative. Don’t take our word for it, check out the nutritional value of peanut oil and see why yourself.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018. Nutrient Data Laboratory.

Peanut Flour, Defatted (1oz.)
Nutrients
Amount
Calories
92.7
Protein
14.8 g
Total Carbohydrate
9.84 g
Dietary Fiber
4.48 g
Total Fat
0.156 g
Saturated Fat
0.018 g
Monounsaturated Fat
0.064 g
Polyunsaturated Fat
0.041 g
Vitamin E
0.014 mg AT
Folate
70.3 mcg
Niacin
7.66 mg
Thiamin
0.198 mg
Riboflavin
0.136 mg
Pantothenic Acid
0.777 mg
Vitamin B6
0.143 mg
Zinc
1.45 mg
Copper
0.51 mg
Selenium
2.01 mcg
Magnesium
105 mg
Phosphorus
215 mg
Potassium
366 mg
Calcium
39.7 mg
Sodium
51 mg
Iron
0.595 mg
Cholesterol
0 mg
Resveratrol
0 mg
Arginine
51 mg

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2018. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Legacy Release, April 2018. Nutrient Data Laboratory.